Witchcraft and Magick

Witchcraft and More© (2)

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Bright Magickal Blessings to you and yours,

the Silver Sage Witch of Witchcraftandmore.com

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Quotes to ponder

Please SUBSCRIBE to my NEW YouTube channel. The Silver Sage Witch of Witchcraft and More©

Greetings to all! Welcome to My new YouTube channel, “Witchcraft and More©.”

My very first video is finally ready for you to see! Ya’ll, we’re going to be discussing the different topics that I’ll be doing videos about, we’ll be acting a bit silly, AND, we’ll be laughing and giggling.

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO MY NEW CHANNEL.

Leave a comment down below to let me know what you think about my new channel, and also about what you would like for me to discuss in future videos.

Your comments and questions are always welcome!

By the way, my NEW BLOG will be available on Friday, 19 June 2020
at the following link: https://witchcraftandmore.com/

The Brightest of Magickal Blessings to you and yours,
the Silver Sage Witch of
Witchcraft and More
P.s. Nothing of a political nature will be in these videos, or on my website/blog called Witchcraft and More©, this is a MAGICKAL ZONE full of peace, love, and kindness….and it doesn’t matter what color you are! 

 

How to Make Beer at Home: The Brewing Guide by Tyghe Trimble, Chris Pagnotta and Matt Allyn

If you like beer and you like making stuff, then you’ll love making beer. Here’s how to get started.

LUCIANO_QUEIROZGETTY IMAGES

You don’t make your own beer to perfect the flavor, really. With more than 6,000 ­breweries in the U.S. alone, there’s a good chance someone’s ­already brewing something you enjoy. You make beer for one reason: because it’s fun. That you also get beer out of it is just a delicious bonus.

Getting Started
Beer Brewing

DANA HOFF/GETTY IMAGES

You don’t need fancy gadgets, says John LaPolla, cofounder of Bitter & Esters, a home-brew shop in Brooklyn, who’s been brewing since 1991 and still uses buckets. “Most people spend around $200 on equipment and ingredients,” LaPolla says. First, find a home-brewing-supply shop near you at homebrewersassociation.org.

The Easy Way: Buy a starter kit. A five-gallon setup from Bitter & Esters costs $150 and includes a ­recipe, ingredients, and all the gear except the ­kettle and the bottles.

Anytime, Anywhere
Glass of beer on the table, with wheat malt and barley

LUCIANO_QUEIROZGETTY IMAGES

You don’t need a brewery, a science lab, or even a garage. “I used to brew five gallons of cider in my kitchen cupboard. Then I graduated to the bottom of a utility shelf, then my closet,” says Douglas Amport, the other cofounder of Bitter & Esters.

Although there’s no ideal time of year for brewing, most beers do well between 60 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. In hotter climates, you can buy special yeast that works at up to 90 degrees, or put your fermenter in the fridge or a cooler filled with ice.

Step 1. Make the Starter Wort

Yeast is an essential part of the beer process. These fungi feast on sugars, making alcohol as they go. The more yeast cells at work, the better the job they do at making alcohol. In this first step of the beer-making process, the yeast cells get a head start, hungrily dividing and populating as they feast on dry malt extract.

Ingredients:

2 quarts water

6 ounces dry malt extract

1 package instant starter wort

First, heat the water and malt to a boil for 10 minutes and then cool to 60 degrees F. You can check the temperature with a thermometer or by rule of thumb (it should be about room temperature).

Sanitize the gallon container with a no-rinse sterilizer or by following the manufacturer’s instructions. Then, pitch the yeast by tossing in

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to-plans/how-to/g143/how-to-make-brew-beer/

The Ultimate Guide to Golden Milk, Everything You Need to Know by Gaia Herbs 

What is Golden Milk?

Golden Milk is based on the traditional Ayurvedic recipe that has been savored for centuries and used to support the mind and body in a number of ways.*

Making Golden Milk from scratch only takes about 15 minutes – if you have all the ingredients already on hand – but in today’s busy world, sometimes even that can feel like an insurmountable task. That’s why we created our own convenient version, which honors the Ayurvedic roots of this nourishing drink – and acknowledges the realities of our overscheduled lives.

Golden Milk is vegan and gluten-free with no GMOs or soy, with natural sweetness from Dates. Golden Milk is a convenient modern spin on a revered ancient drink.

Golden Milk Ingredients

What’s in Golden Milk? Turmeric, for sure! This warm yellow beverage takes its color from Turmeric, which we combine with other traditional Ayurvedic herbs like Black Pepper, Cardamom, Vanilla and Ashwagandha.

Turmeric

Turmeric is a versatile herb that supports a healthy inflammatory response in the whole body while maintaining overall health and vitality.* Turmeric offers whole-body support, with both antioxidant support and support for a healthy inflammatory response.* (Read more about using Turmeric for cooking and taking it as a supplement.)

Black Pepper

Traditionally paired with Turmeric to support absorption, Black Pepper also adds a hint of spiciness.* This herb is very common in Ayurveda, and it is traditionally considered to be a hot, pungent herb. As such, it stokes digestive fire, called agni, by promoting the natural release of digestive secretions.* It was actually called the “King of Spices.”

Vanilla

The sweet aroma of this herb has long been used to naturally boost mood.* Plus, it just tastes so good in warm milk! Traditionally, Vanilla was considered to be an aromatic herb that supports the nervous system, and it was used to support a healthy libido.*

Ashwagandha

Valued in Ayurveda, this adaptogen tonifies the entire system.* Ashwagandha is one of the most popular Ayurvedic herbs used today. This herb is both a tonic, meaning it supports the body’s overall wellbeing, and an adaptogen, meaning it supports the body’s natural resistance.*

Cardamom

This aromatic herb has a long history of supporting the digestive system.* A relative of Ginger, Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) was called the “Queen of Spices” in Ayurveda, where it is commonly used. It supports elimination of intestinal gas, while improving digestive function.*

Dates

This naturally rich, sweet fruit is a source of vitamins and minerals. Dates have a complex sweet taste similar to caramel, making them a popular swap for sugar. The Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) dates back 50 million years, according to fossil records. A staple across the Middle East, it is made into sugar, vinegar and syrup.

Other recipes, both traditional and modern, use additional herbs. Ginger is a common addition to support digestion and add spiciness.* Allspice, Cloves, Mace and Nutmeg are sometimes used, too. Saffron – which has been used in Ayurveda to support a healthy mood – can also be added.*

Learn More about ingredients in Gaia Herbs Golden Milk at MeetYourHerbs.

How to Make Golden Milk – It’s Easy!

Making Golden Milk is easy. Follow these basic steps to make this Turmeric-based beverage:

Serves: 1

Prep Time: 1 min Cook Time: 5 min

Ingredients:  READ MORE HERE:  https://www.gaiaherbs.com/blogs/seeds-of-knowledge/the-ultimate-guide-to-golden-milk

It’s Almost Time! By the Silver Sage Sideways 8

⚡🧘🏽‍♀️⚡Greetings my Arising Soul Family!

🤗Please do subscribe to my YouTube channel and follow my blog on NewFound-Life.com  because very soon, my NEW SERIES, “The Enchanted Ivy Cottage,” will be available🤩.

Have a great 😘weekend!

the Silver Sage Sideways 8 of Newfound-life.com
wishes you UNDERSTANDING, BALANCE, and PEACE! 👁🧘🏽‍♀️⚖✌🏽💖

420 Meaning: The True Story Of How April 20 Became ‘Weed Day’ By Ryan Grim

Warren Haynes, the Allman Brothers Band guitarist, routinely plays with the surviving members of the Grateful Dead, now touring as The Dead. He’s just finished a Dead show in Washington, D.C., and gets a pop quiz from the Huffington Post.

Where does 420 come from?

 

He pauses and thinks, hands on his side. “I don’t know the real origin. I know myths and rumors,” he says. “I’m really confused about the first time I heard it. It was like a police code for smoking in progress or something. What’s the real story?”

Depending on who you ask, or their state of inebriation, there are as many varieties of answers as strains of medical bud in California. It’s the number of active chemicals in marijuana. It’s teatime in Holland. It has something to do with Hitler’s birthday. It’s those numbers in that Bob Dylan song multiplied.

 

The origin of the term 420, celebrated around the world by pot smokers every April 20, has long been obscured by the clouded memories of the folks who made it a phenomenon.

The Huffington Post chased the term back to its roots and was able to find it in a lost patch of cannabis in a Point Reyes, California forest. Just as interesting as its origin, it turns out, is how it spread.

It starts with the Dead.

 

It was Christmas week in Oakland, 1990. Steven Bloom was wandering through The Lot – that timeless gathering of hippies that springs up in the parking lot before every Grateful Dead concert – when a Deadhead handed him a yellow flyer.

“We are going to meet at 4:20 on 4/20 for 420-ing in Marin County at the Bolinas Ridge sunset spot on Mt. Tamalpais,” reads the message, which Bloom dug up and forwarded to the Huffington Post. Bloom, then a reporter for High Times magazine and now the publisher of CelebStoner.com and co-author of Pot Culture, had never heard of “420-ing” before.

 

The flyer came complete with a 420 back story: “420 started somewhere in San Rafael, California in the late ‘70s. It started as the police code for Marijuana Smoking in Progress. After local heads heard of the police call, they started using the expression 420 when referring to herb – Let’s Go 420, dude!”

Bloom reported his find in the May 1991 issue of High Times, which the magazine found in its archives and provided to the Huffington Post. The story, though, was only partially right.

 

It had nothing to do with a police code — though the San Rafael part was dead on. Indeed, a group of five San Rafael High School friends known as the Waldos – by virtue of their chosen hang-out spot, a wall outside the school – coined the term in 1971. The Huffington Post spoke with Waldo Steve, Waldo Dave and Dave’s older brother, Patrick, and confirmed their full names and identities, which they asked to keep secret for professional reasons. (Pot is still, after all, illegal.)

 

The Waldos never envisioned that pot smokers the world over would celebrate each April 20th as a result of their foray into the Point Reyes forest. The day has managed to become something of a national holiday in the face of official condemnation. This year’s celebration will be no different. Officials at the University of Colorado at Boulder and University of California, Santa Cruz, which boast two of the biggest smoke outs, are pushing back. “As another April 20 approaches, we are faced with concerns from students, parents, alumni, Regents, and community members about a repeat of last year’s 4/20 ‘event,’” wrote Boulder’s chancellor in a letter to students. “On April 20, 2009, we hope that you will choose not to participate in unlawful activity that

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/420-meaning-the-true-stor_n_543854?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAAlbjCHMcw7i71rFAGaUngSeORRwevwmw5kqnznU1Ptu_OG3K0P16ciHxCLWNNw5xyuq17h7H2cDaPqVU4aw85rIWIp2ZFDr4Fwbgp5ARIKaQdiZGtqcsBJevAo4mucmI13nzkmP66cy5djITdxWZpuck-2N2hYPiH0ufUJUR8GF

Witches ointment BY VAMZZZ

Witches ointment is an ointment or paste with which people (mostly women known as witches) are said to have rubbed themselves in order to fly to the witches sabbath in the late Middle Ages and at the time of the early modern witch persecutions.

witches ointment

 

The ointment is known by a wide variety of names, including witches’ flying ointmentgreen ointmentmagic salve, or lycanthropic ointment. In German it was Hexensalbe (witch salve) or Flugsalbe (flying salve). In Holland, vliegzalf (flying salve) or heksenzalf (witches’ ointment). Latin names included unguentum sabbati (sabbath unguent), unguentum pharelisunguentum populi (poplar unguent) or unguenta somnifera (sleeping unguent).

young basque witch rubbing flying ointment

Witch ointments are ointment preparations made from psychoactive substances (especially from nightshade plants), the use of which can cause hallucinations or delusional dreams. To stigmatize “witches” as evil and demonic the “fat of children” is regularly mentioned by those who led the burning times to its horror climax.

The misogyne psychopath Heinrich Kramer (Institoris) describes in 1486 in the second part of his infamous Malleus Maleficarum (Hexenhammer, Hammer of the Witches) that witches could rise in the air because of an ointment made from children’s extremities. Even Francis Bacon listed as the ingredients of the witches ointment “the fat of children digged out of their graves, juices of smallage, wolfe-bane, and cinque foil, mingled with the meal of fine wheat.”

 

Highly toxic ingredients

Typical poisonous ingredients included belladonna or nightshade, henbane bell, jimson weed (Datura stramonium), black henbane, mandrake, hemlock, and/or wolfsbane, most of which contain atropine, hyoscyamine, and/or scopolamine. Scopolamine can cause psychotropic effects when absorbed through the skin.

Apart from these herbs mushrooms like the Amanita muscaria, commonly known as the fly agaric or fly amanita and ergot or the poison of toads (bufotenin) were used to trigger psychotropic effects, like out of body experiences, seeing Elemental and nature spirits, flying through the air or intense orgasms. Pigs fat was used instead of childrens’ fat.

In the ages these ointments were used frequently they made many casualties because of their toxicity and the problem that it is very difficult to estimate how much of the active psychotropic substance a herb contains. This differs due to ground quality, time of the year, weather, condition of the plant, moment of picking etc.. Even in modern times experimenting with these ointments can be fatal. The German historian, occultist and theosophist Carl Kiesewetter for exemple, author of Geschichte des Neueren Occultismus 1892 and Die Geheimwissenschaften, eine Kulturgeschichte der Esoterik 1895 died while testing an witches ointment recipe on himself.

To make a long story short: experimenting with witch ointment herbs is NOT advisable!

poppy witches ointment

One possible key to how individuals dealt with the toxicity of the nightshades usually said to be part of flying ointments is through the supposed antidotal reaction some of the solanaceous alkaloids have with the alkaloids of Papaver somniferum (opium poppy). This is discussed by Alexander Kuklin in his brief book, How Do Witches Fly? (DNA Press, 1999).

This antagonism was claimed to exist by the movement of Eclectic medicine. For instance,

 

READ MORE HERE:  https://vamzzz.com/blog/witches-ointment/