Meditation

Quotes to ponder

Quotes to ponder

When too much fresh air is bad for you posted by Dr. Sandy

running out of air in a polluted environment

“Fresh air is good, if you don’t take too much of it”

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr

Taking in MORE FRESH AIR, is a lofty health  goal…. something we should all aspire to.

BUT,  FRESH AIR is not the same as PURE AIR.  No matter where you reside, the air you breathe includes pollutants….

  • ammonia,
  • sulphur dioxide,
  • ozone, and
  • nitrogen dioxide

For heavier folks…. FRESH AIR represents a two edged sword, because they’re getting,  too much.

Too much of a good thing

Researchers from the Université de Montréal’s School of Public Health, compared breathing rates in normal weight, overweight and obese individuals, as there went about their “normal” business. The team used a technique that tracked the disappearance of deuterium and heavy oxygen, to calculate average inhalation rates over a period of 7-21 days.

The team discovered, overweight/obese adults , breathe between 7-50 % more air per day, than normal weight individuals.

That’s a lot more FRESH AIR going in…

Good air gone bad

All that extra air, passing in and out of the lungs, is accompanied by pollutants.  So more air in, also  means more pollutants are able to enter the lungs.

Since these air contaminants typically act as irritants …..

  • they can directly upset the epithelial cells lining the lungs, contributing to asthma and other pulmonary diseases.
  • they can also indirectly contribute to oxidative stress, promoting  metabolic upsets and furthering obesity.

This propensity of the heavy,  to breathe in MORE, creates a vulnerability….

Asthma-obesity connection

Officially asthma and obesity are separate health problems, but, in reality, they often go together, this research suggests, it is not a co-incidence.

Breathing rates connect the two conditions.

This is why, many people find their asthma symptoms track their weight.  When they lose a few pounds, they breathe a little easier, when they put on a few pounds, breathing becomes a little more laboured.

So what can be done to break this connection ?

Breathe less

Since the problem begins with too much “FRESH AIR” –  the fix is to

READ MORE HERE:  https://betterbodychemistry.com/obesity/fresh-air-bad/

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The health benefits of quinoa by Jo Lewin

A bowl and two spoons filled with uncooked quinoa seeds

A complete protein and fantastic wheat-free alternative, the demand for quinoa has risen sharply in recent years. Nutritionist Jo Lewin shares recipes, cooking tips and the nutritional highlights of this fashionable grain-like crop…

An introduction to quinoa

Quinoa, pronounced ‘keen-wa’ is a great wheat-free alternative to starchy grains. There are two types: red and creamy white. Both types are slightly bitter when cooked and open up to release little white curls (like a tail) as they soften.

Grown in South America (Peru, Chile and Bolivia) for thousands of years, quinoa formed the staple diet of the Incas and their descendants. In recent years, foodies in the UK and the US have heralded it as a superior alternative to bulgur wheat, couscous and rice. Though it often occupies a similar role to these grains in dishes, quinoa is actually a seed from the same family as beets, chard and spinach.

Nutritional highlights…

The UN named 2013 ‘International Quinoa Year’ in recognition of the crop’s high nutrient content. With twice the protein content of rice or barley, quinoa is also a very good source of calcium, magnesium and manganese. It also contributes useful levels of several B vitamins, vitamin E and dietary fibre.

Cooked quinoa seeds become fluffy and creamy, yet maintains a slight crunch. It has a delicate and subtly nutty flavor, versatile for breakfast (as a cereal), lunch (as a salad) or dinner (as a side).

Quinoa is among the least allergenic of all the ‘grains’, making it a fantastic wheat-free choice. Like buckwheat, quinoa has an excellent amino acid profile, as it contains all nine essential amino acids making it a complete-protein source. Quinoa is therefore an excellent choice for vegans.

A 100g serving of cooked quinoa provides:
 120 calories 4.4g protein 1.9g fat 19.4g carbohydrate 2.8g fibre

Research

Quinoa is high in anti-inflammatory phytonutrients, which make it potentially beneficial for human health in the prevention and treatment of disease. Quinoa contains small amounts of the heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids and, in comparison to common cereal grasses has a higher content of monounsaturated fat.

As a complete protein, quinoa contains all nine essential amino acids – including the elusive lysine and isoleucine acids, which most other grains lack. Naturally high in dietary fibre, quinoa is a slowly digested carbohydrate, making it a good low-GI option.

How to select & store

Ensure there are no tears or holes in the packet of quinoa you are buying as moisture can affect the freshness of the grain. Store in an airtight container and keep it in a cool, dry place where it can last for several months.

Safety

When boiling quinoa, the compound that coats the seeds (saponins) creates a foam. These saponins give quinoa a slightly bitter taste. It is best to remove any leftover saponins on the quinoa coat; thoroughly washing the seeds before cooking by putting them into a sieve and running them under cold water. Once you have rinsed it well, it can be cooked like rice. It will expand to several

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-quinoa