Is Quinoa Gluten-Free? By Bojana Galic Reviewed by Bonnie Taub-Dix, MA, RD, CDN

Quinoa is naturally gluten-free but you’ll want to check the package nevertheless.
Image Credit: 4kodiak/iStock/GettyImages

If you’re looking to avoid gluten or simply want to add some variety to your plate, add quinoa to your cart. Quinoa is a naturally gluten-free seed (yes, it’s technically a seed) that’s safe for those with gluten intolerance or sensitivity, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation.

However, not all products or quinoa blends are necessarily free of gluten, so you should check for gluten-free labels on your quinoa packaging. Likewise, at a restaurant, you’ll want to verify your quinoa is prepared separately from gluten-containing ingredients such as wheat, rye or barley.

Why You Should Include Quinoa in a Gluten-Free Diet

When it comes to the many marvelous types of grains, knowing which varieties do and don’t contain gluten requires some memorization. Alongside gluten-free buckwheat (yes, buckwheat is gluten-free even though the word ‘wheat’ is within its name), quinoa is another you can add to the gluten-free list.

Quinoa is high in fiber, iron and magnesium, according to the Whole Grains Council. You’ll get about 3 grams of fiber total, which is about 12 percent of your daily recommended value, per 1/4 cup of uncooked quinoa.

Quinoa is also one of the only plant-based sources of complete protein, meaning it contains all nine essential amino acids that your body can’t produce on its own. You’ll get about 6 total grams of complete protein per serving.

Tip

If you haven’t eaten quinoa before and have a gluten intolerance or sensitivity, introduce it into your diet gradually, recommends Joanna Foley, RD. “Quinoa should be well tolerated by most people with gluten sensitivity, yet should be introduced gradually and in small portions to allow the body to become familiar,” she says. “Always pay close attention to symptoms, since it is possible to develop sensitivities to many foods.”

Verifying Your Quinoa Is Gluten-Free

In its natural form, quinoa is gluten-free. However, quinoa can be exposed to gluten-containing ingredients either during preparation or during manufacturing, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. So, if you’re at a restaurant, you’ll want to verify that your quinoa is prepared on separate surfaces and with separate utensils.

When buying packaged quinoa, check the container to make sure it’s safe from cross-contamination. If your package is labeled gluten-free, that means it contains less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten, making it generally safe for consumption, according to the FDA.

In some cases, your quinoa may even have a Certified Gluten-Free seal on the

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.livestrong.com/article/13725535-is-quinoa-gluten-free/

What Kind of Tea Settles Your Stomach? By Sarka-Jonae Miller

A hot cup of tea may be just what you need if you have an upset stomach. The herbs in some teas have a calming effect, but the reason behind your abdominal pain or nausea is important in selecting the right type of tea. Consult your doctor before trying herbal remedies to diagnosis the cause of your abdominal discomfort.

Ginger

Ginger tea may settle the stomach when taken for indigestion, nausea or abdominal gas. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, studies indicate that ginger can decrease the symptoms of motion sickness. Ginger does not treat motion sickness as well as medications, but it could decrease vomiting. Ginger is believed to reduce nausea and vomiting in pregnant women, and possibly the time and severity of nausea in chemotherapy patients.

Peppermint

Peppermint tea is used to settle the stomach and aid digestion, and it may help improve nausea, menstrual cramps and flatulence, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Ingesting peppermint soothes the stomach muscles and increases bile flow, allowing your body to better digest fat and pass food through the stomach quickly. The muscle relaxation also aids abdominal gas to pass out of the body. Peppermint tea is usually safe, but is contraindicated in

READ MORE HERE: https://www.livestrong.com/article/555242-what-kind-of-tea-settles-your-stomach/

The health benefits of quinoa by Jo Lewin

A bowl and two spoons filled with uncooked quinoa seeds

A complete protein and fantastic wheat-free alternative, the demand for quinoa has risen sharply in recent years. Nutritionist Jo Lewin shares recipes, cooking tips and the nutritional highlights of this fashionable grain-like crop…

An introduction to quinoa

Quinoa, pronounced ‘keen-wa’ is a great wheat-free alternative to starchy grains. There are two types: red and creamy white. Both types are slightly bitter when cooked and open up to release little white curls (like a tail) as they soften.

Grown in South America (Peru, Chile and Bolivia) for thousands of years, quinoa formed the staple diet of the Incas and their descendants. In recent years, foodies in the UK and the US have heralded it as a superior alternative to bulgur wheat, couscous and rice. Though it often occupies a similar role to these grains in dishes, quinoa is actually a seed from the same family as beets, chard and spinach.

Nutritional highlights…

The UN named 2013 ‘International Quinoa Year’ in recognition of the crop’s high nutrient content. With twice the protein content of rice or barley, quinoa is also a very good source of calcium, magnesium and manganese. It also contributes useful levels of several B vitamins, vitamin E and dietary fibre.

Cooked quinoa seeds become fluffy and creamy, yet maintains a slight crunch. It has a delicate and subtly nutty flavor, versatile for breakfast (as a cereal), lunch (as a salad) or dinner (as a side).

Quinoa is among the least allergenic of all the ‘grains’, making it a fantastic wheat-free choice. Like buckwheat, quinoa has an excellent amino acid profile, as it contains all nine essential amino acids making it a complete-protein source. Quinoa is therefore an excellent choice for vegans.

A 100g serving of cooked quinoa provides:
 120 calories 4.4g protein 1.9g fat 19.4g carbohydrate 2.8g fibre

Research

Quinoa is high in anti-inflammatory phytonutrients, which make it potentially beneficial for human health in the prevention and treatment of disease. Quinoa contains small amounts of the heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids and, in comparison to common cereal grasses has a higher content of monounsaturated fat.

As a complete protein, quinoa contains all nine essential amino acids – including the elusive lysine and isoleucine acids, which most other grains lack. Naturally high in dietary fibre, quinoa is a slowly digested carbohydrate, making it a good low-GI option.

How to select & store

Ensure there are no tears or holes in the packet of quinoa you are buying as moisture can affect the freshness of the grain. Store in an airtight container and keep it in a cool, dry place where it can last for several months.

Safety

When boiling quinoa, the compound that coats the seeds (saponins) creates a foam. These saponins give quinoa a slightly bitter taste. It is best to remove any leftover saponins on the quinoa coat; thoroughly washing the seeds before cooking by putting them into a sieve and running them under cold water. Once you have rinsed it well, it can be cooked like rice. It will expand to several

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-quinoa

BBQ Time!

Greetings my Arising Soul Family!

Let’s get you ready for a delicious vegetarian BBQ that you can do this weekend with your family and friends.

Isn’t it great that you can have a BBQ without taking the life of another living being!  Grilled veggies are fantastic, and I know you’ll love them if you just give them a chance.

I wish you and yours, Understanding, Balance, and Peace,

the Silver Sage of

NewFound-Life.com

The Risk of NOT Trying New Foods

There’s actually a scientific term for the fear of tasting unfamiliar dishes: food neophobia. It’s not just the name that is scary. A study from Finland and Estonia found that people with this trait eat lower-quality diets overall and have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes — regardless of their age, sex, or weight. To add more variety to your diet, you’ll need to be persistent. “An individual may need to try a new food 10 to 15 times before getting accustomed to it,” says study coauthor Heikki Sarin.

Copyright Reader’s Digest April 2020 Issue, Page 52

“The Beginning of The Enchanted Ivy Cottage Series 22 May 20” by the Silver Sage Sideways 8

Greetings my Arising Soul Family!

It’s getting closer…my new series called, “The Enchanted Ivy Cottage!”

PLEASE, subscribe to my YouTube channel and follow my blog.

This is just a quickie video to tell you more about my new series.

WARNING: Some tops will be very controversial.

the Silver Sage Sideways 8 of Newfound-life.com

Wishing you INNERSTANDING, BALANCE, & PEACE! 👁🧘🏽‍♀️⚖✌🏽💖

It’s Almost Time! By the Silver Sage Sideways 8

⚡🧘🏽‍♀️⚡Greetings my Arising Soul Family!

🤗Please do subscribe to my YouTube channel and follow my blog on NewFound-Life.com  because very soon, my NEW SERIES, “The Enchanted Ivy Cottage,” will be available🤩.

Have a great 😘weekend!

the Silver Sage Sideways 8 of Newfound-life.com
wishes you UNDERSTANDING, BALANCE, and PEACE! 👁🧘🏽‍♀️⚖✌🏽💖

It’s About To Get Real! By the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com

👁Greetings my Arising Soul Family! (ASF🧠)

Just a tip…the Silver Sage is getting ready to open your eyes with new information, ideas, and facts.

Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel and FOLLOW my blog on NewFound-Life.com So you can join in.

🤓It’s about to get real…

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCopeuk53MA1yZp32xlP_DQg

#thesilversage

https://newfound-life.com/blog-post/

the Silver Sage, wishing you understanding balance and peace 🧘🏽‍♀️⚖✌🏽