The health benefits of quinoa by Jo Lewin

A bowl and two spoons filled with uncooked quinoa seeds

A complete protein and fantastic wheat-free alternative, the demand for quinoa has risen sharply in recent years. Nutritionist Jo Lewin shares recipes, cooking tips and the nutritional highlights of this fashionable grain-like crop…

An introduction to quinoa

Quinoa, pronounced ‘keen-wa’ is a great wheat-free alternative to starchy grains. There are two types: red and creamy white. Both types are slightly bitter when cooked and open up to release little white curls (like a tail) as they soften.

Grown in South America (Peru, Chile and Bolivia) for thousands of years, quinoa formed the staple diet of the Incas and their descendants. In recent years, foodies in the UK and the US have heralded it as a superior alternative to bulgur wheat, couscous and rice. Though it often occupies a similar role to these grains in dishes, quinoa is actually a seed from the same family as beets, chard and spinach.

Nutritional highlights…

The UN named 2013 ‘International Quinoa Year’ in recognition of the crop’s high nutrient content. With twice the protein content of rice or barley, quinoa is also a very good source of calcium, magnesium and manganese. It also contributes useful levels of several B vitamins, vitamin E and dietary fibre.

Cooked quinoa seeds become fluffy and creamy, yet maintains a slight crunch. It has a delicate and subtly nutty flavor, versatile for breakfast (as a cereal), lunch (as a salad) or dinner (as a side).

Quinoa is among the least allergenic of all the ‘grains’, making it a fantastic wheat-free choice. Like buckwheat, quinoa has an excellent amino acid profile, as it contains all nine essential amino acids making it a complete-protein source. Quinoa is therefore an excellent choice for vegans.

A 100g serving of cooked quinoa provides:
 120 calories 4.4g protein 1.9g fat 19.4g carbohydrate 2.8g fibre

Research

Quinoa is high in anti-inflammatory phytonutrients, which make it potentially beneficial for human health in the prevention and treatment of disease. Quinoa contains small amounts of the heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids and, in comparison to common cereal grasses has a higher content of monounsaturated fat.

As a complete protein, quinoa contains all nine essential amino acids – including the elusive lysine and isoleucine acids, which most other grains lack. Naturally high in dietary fibre, quinoa is a slowly digested carbohydrate, making it a good low-GI option.

How to select & store

Ensure there are no tears or holes in the packet of quinoa you are buying as moisture can affect the freshness of the grain. Store in an airtight container and keep it in a cool, dry place where it can last for several months.

Safety

When boiling quinoa, the compound that coats the seeds (saponins) creates a foam. These saponins give quinoa a slightly bitter taste. It is best to remove any leftover saponins on the quinoa coat; thoroughly washing the seeds before cooking by putting them into a sieve and running them under cold water. Once you have rinsed it well, it can be cooked like rice. It will expand to several

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-quinoa

20 Different Types of Melons By Lisa Miller

Types of Melons

Melons were introduced to Europe by the Ancient Romans, and travelled to the New World with the Spanish explorers – probably as a way to help them fend off scurvy during their voyages due to their high vitamin C content. Spanish settlers are recorded as having cultivated melons starting in the mid-16th century in parts of South America.

Botanically speaking, melons are actually a type of ‘false’ berry in the Cucurbitaceae family. They will vary widely in size and color, but the ones most people are familiar with are sweet or semi-sweet fruit with a smooth or mesh-like ‘skin’ and a soft, fleshy inside part that can be consumed. Most melons will have small pockets filled with seeds (which in some cases can be eaten and are actually quite good for you) in the center of the edible flesh, while others will have the seeds spread through the flesh.

Normally a quite hardy and adaptable fruit, today melons are grown in many parts of the world although they prefer sunny, warm climates that feature lots of rain and good drainage. Hundreds of millions of tons of melons are produced worldwide every year, with China accounting over 25% of all melon production. Other major producers include Iran, Turkey, India, Brazil, the United States, Egypt and Spain.

Melons are one of the most nutritious foodstuffs around, and provide humans with a number of essential vitamins and minerals, digestive fiber, and – because of their high water content – also serve as an excellent diuretic. Additionally, many melons are downright delicious and can be eaten alone, as part of a fruit or other salad, or used in cooking other dishes.

So, what are some of the most popular types of melons?

Different Types of Melon

Watermelon

Types of Melons

Watermelon is one of the most popular of all the different melon varieties, and is probably the first melon to be eaten regularly by humans. Originating in Northeastern Africa, it has been cultivated and consumed by people for over 4,000 years. Watermelons are the fruit of a flowering, vine-like plant in the Citrullus lanatus species of the Cucurbitaceae family.

Today, about 120 million tons of watermelon is cultivated throughout the world annually, with China producing nearly 70% of the yearly crop and Iran, Turkey and Brazil together accounting for another 10%. In the United States, watermelon is grown commercially in over 40 states; the largest watermelon on record weighed just over 350 pounds and was grown by a farmer in Tennessee in 2013.

There are a very large number of varieties of watermelon – over 1,200, as a matter of fact – and they range in weight from under two pounds to over 200 pounds, but most have a few things in common. They are considered to be a tropical or sub-tropical fruit and grow best in climates where the temperature doesn’t dip much below 80 degrees Fahrenheit (25 degrees Celsius) during the growing season. Watermelons have one of the longest growing periods of any melon, often taking over 90 days to reach maturity.

Since the 1950s, watermelons have been cross-bred and genetically enhanced to improve their ability to grow in colder climates and improve their shelf-life. Seedless watermelons were first developed in Japan during the late 1930s, and today account for over 80% of all watermelon sales in the United States.

Watermelons normally have about a 90% water content (hence the name) and are completely edible – although many people choose not to eat the rinds (even though they are packed with nutrients) because of the bitter taste, and spit out the seeds. The moist, fibrous fruit is usually red, yellow or orange and is quite sweet. Watermelon is very popular throughout the world during the summer months because the fruit will remain cool for a long period of time without refrigeration due to its size.

Apart from being an excellent snack on a hot summer day, watermelon is often juiced, and sometimes mixed with other juices and fermented to produce wine. The seeds can be dried and roasted and consumed as a snack, while the rinds are often used in pickle-making, or stir fried and served as a vegetable with some Asian dishes. Watermelon seed oil is used frequently in cooking in some parts of West Africa.

Cantaloupe

Types of Melons

Cantaloupes (also sometimes called a mush melon, musk melon or sweet melon) are part of the Cucumis melo species of melons. These melons have can have either a netted or smooth peel. There are actually two main types of melons that are commonly called cantaloupes; the European and the North American cantaloupe.

The European cantaloupe (sometimes called a ‘true’ cantaloupe) normally has a smooth,

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.elist10.com/different-types-of-melons/

Quotes to ponder

How to Grow Patio Tomatoes by Gardening Channel

How to grow successful patio tomatoes

ABOUT PATIO TOMATOES

The Patio and Patio Hybrid tomato varieties give away their gardening instructions in their names. They are designed for growing on patios, decks or balconies in containers. They grow to about two feet tall, with plenty of dark green foliage. These dwarf tomatoes are a determinate tomato variety that can be called the ideal container plant, and have become one of the most popular small container tomatoes sold in the United States. Determinate means they grow compactly and produce fruits that are close together. Patios also have relatively large fruit among the dwarf tomatoes, averaging about three to four ounces per tomato. Their strong stems and bush-like shape make them perfect for a good tomato yield right from your patio.

Want to buy tomato plants online and have them shipped to you?

We recommend The Tasteful Garden for the online purchase of tomato plants. They carry heirloom tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, slicing tomatoes, black, orange, red and many, many other tomato varieties. Check out the Legend Tomato, shown above.

IDEAL SOIL CONDITIONS FOR TOMATOES

When growing dwarf tomatoes in containers, you need a well-drained, loose, but rich soil. You can use potting soil, which is mixed for this purpose, or make your own. Mix leaf mold or fine mulch in with some peat moss, vermiculite or perlite for a lightening effect that will ensure good drainage. The basic soil that you mix these with should be a dark, moist soil like humus, or even compost. Add more peat, mulch or equivalents to heavy compost, though, to be sure it doesn’t retain water too heavily and risk

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.gardeningchannel.com/how-to-grow-patio-tomatoes/

The EASIEST Bread You’ll Ever Make (Beginner Bread Recipe) by the Prairie Homestead

Hello my Arising Soul Family!  I hope you are having a great Summer Solstice and just having a wonderful, fun, happy, peaceful time!

I really want to try this recipe….hopefully I’ll find the time to do so.  If you decide to try it, please let me know how it turned out.

Enjoy the rest of this weekend,

the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com

BBQ Time!

Greetings my Arising Soul Family!

Let’s get you ready for a delicious vegetarian BBQ that you can do this weekend with your family and friends.

Isn’t it great that you can have a BBQ without taking the life of another living being!  Grilled veggies are fantastic, and I know you’ll love them if you just give them a chance.

I wish you and yours, Understanding, Balance, and Peace,

the Silver Sage of

NewFound-Life.com