Hemp oil vs CBD oil and why the difference matters | Well+Good By Rachel Lapidos

In this plant-happy world we live in, you can find me slathering cannabidiol or CBD on my muscles to relieve soreness, applying it to my skin to soothe inflammation, and dropping it into my daily water for stress relief. In fairness, I’m drinking the proverbial Kool-Aid, but until recently I didn’t recognize the difference between hemp oil vs CBD oil, and as it happens, there’s a big one.

These days, the green-washing on CBD products can be hard to navigate, and the vocab one needs to navigate the CBD-lined shelves is extensive to say the least. Brands want to get in on the much-praised benefits, after all—but the issue here is that the terms being marketed under the “cannabis” umbrella aren’t all the same thing.

Truth be told, oftentimes, you’ll see the cannabis plant touted on a label, but the specific ingredient being used

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.wellandgood.com/good-looks/hemp-oil-vs-cbd-oil/

Do You Need a Vitamin D Supplement? BY KRISTEN DOMONELL

child's sunshine drawing on a rain covered window

Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium, helping you build strong bones and stave off osteoporosis. It’s also important for your immune system and your muscles. Typically, the sun helps your body produce all the vitamin D you need, or at least close enough that you can get the rest through your diet.

But if you live in the Pacific Northwest, there’s a good chance you aren’t getting enough of it in the fall and winter months, says Heather Tick, M.D., a family medicine doctor at University of Washington Medical Center-Roosevelt.

“Even if you go to the top of Mount Rainier in the middle of winter and get a sunburn, you won’t be getting the UVB rays you need to make vitamin D,” she says.

This is a problem, because vitamin D deficiency has been linked to a whole host of health issues from heart disease and depression to Parkinson’s diseasemultiple sclerosisdementia and Alzheimer’s disease. And if you’re diagnosed with breast cancer or prostate cancer, your chances of survival may be lower than someone with normal vitamin D levels.

So how can you tell if you need more vitamin D—and if you should stock up on supplements to make it through the next few months? Here’s everything you need to know about the sunny day vitamin.

Sun, sardines and supplements: How your body gets vitamin D

The sun emits two types of ultraviolet rays that reach the earth: UVA (long-wave) and UVB (short-wave). UVA rays penetrate your skin more deeply. UVB rays, on the other hand, help your body make vitamin D. But getting the vitamin D you need isn’t quite as simple as stepping outside.

In the winter—especially in northern latitudes—the sun never gets high enough in the sky for UVB rays to penetrate the atmosphere and reach your skin, says Tick.

That means that from about September to June, you can’t rely on the sun to give you the vitamin D you need, she says. Plus, if you wear sunscreen in the summer, as you should, you can kiss your vitamin D production goodbye.

Sunny days aside, you can also get vitamin D from food, but the options are limited. Fatty fish like salmon, swordfish, tuna, mackerel and sardines are all sources of vitamin D, as are egg yolks. Some cereals, orange juice, milk, cheese and yogurt are fortified with vitamin D, too, meaning it’s added in during production to make it easier for people to sneak in vitamin D.

How much vitamin D do you need?

Unless you are really vigilant about tracking vitamin D in the foods you eat, it can be hard to know if you’re getting enough. Symptoms of vitamin D deficiency can be vague, says Lucille Marchand, M.D., a family medicine doctor at UW Medical Center.

Many people who have lower-than-normal vitamin D levels don’t realize it. Your doctor may suggest a blood test to measure your vitamin D level if you have fatigue, muscle aches or bone aches that can’t be attributed to something else, she says.

“If they correct the deficiency, chances are, they’re going to help that person feel better,” says Marchand.

How much do you need? The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended dietary allowance is 600 international units up to age 70, and 800 IU for people who are older. Both Marchand and Tick agree these recommendations are conservative.

Plus, higher daily doses through supplementation may be beneficial for people with chronic pain or those who are trying to

Do You Live with Anxiety? Here Are 11 Ways to Cope Written by Ally Hirschlag

Breathe: There are ways to calm your anxiety

Know that feeling of your heart beating faster in response to a stressful situation? Or perhaps, instead, your palms get sweaty when you’re confronted with an overwhelming task or event.

That’s anxiety — our body’s natural response to stress.

If you haven’t recognized your triggers yet, here are a few common: your first day at a new job, meeting your partner’s family, or giving a presentation in front of a lot of people. Everyone has different triggers, and identifying them is one of the most important steps to coping and managing anxiety attacks.

Identifying your triggers can take some time and self-reflection. In the meantime, there are things you can do to try to help calm or quiet your anxiety from taking over.

 

5 quick ways to cope with anxiety

If your anxiety is sporadic and getting in the way of your focus or tasks, there are some quick, homeopathic remedies that could help you take control of the situation.

If your anxiety is focused around a situation, such as being worried about an upcoming event, you may notice the symptoms are short-lived and usually subside after the anticipated event takes place.

Question your thought pattern

Negative thoughts can take root in your mind and distort the severity of the situation. One way is to challenge your fears, ask if they’re true, and see where you can take back control.

Practice focused, deep breathing

Try breathing in for 4 counts and breathing out for 4 counts for 5 minutes total. By evening out your breath, you’ll slow your heart rate which should help calm you down.

The 4-7-8 technique is also known to help anxiety.

Use aromatherapy

Whether they’re in oil form, incense, or a candle, scents like lavender, chamomile, and sandalwood can be very soothing.

Aromatherapy is thought to help activate certain receptors in your brain, potentially easing anxiety.

Go for a walk or do 15 minutes of yoga

Sometimes, the best way to stop anxious thoughts is to walk away from the situation. Taking some time to focus on your body and not your mind may help relieve your anxiety.

Write down your thoughts

Writing down what’s making you anxious gets it out of your head and can make it less daunting.

These relaxation tricks are particularly helpful for those who experience anxiety sporadically. They may also work well with someone who has generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) when they’re in a bind too!

However, if you suspect you have GAD, quick coping methods shouldn’t be the only kind of treatment you employ. You’ll want to find long-term strategies to help lessen the severity of symptoms and even prevent them from happening.

6 long-term strategies for coping with anxiety

If anxiety is a regular part of your life, it’s important to find treatment strategies to help you keep it in check. It might be a combination of things, like talk therapy and meditation, or it might just be a matter of cutting out or resolving your anxiety trigger.

If you’re not sure where to start, it’s always helpful to discuss options with a mental health professional who might suggest something you hadn’t thought of before.

Identify and learn to manage your triggers

You can identify triggers on your own or with a therapist. Sometimes they can be obvious, like caffeine, drinking alcohol, or smoking. Other times they can be less obvious.

Long-term problems, such as financial or work-related situations, may take some time to figure out — is it a due date, a person, or the situation? This may take some extra support, through therapy or with friends.

When you do figure out your trigger, you should try to limit your exposure if you can. If you can’t limit it — like if it’s due to a stressful work environment that you can’t currently change — using other coping techniques may help.

Some general triggers:

Continue reading “Do You Live with Anxiety? Here Are 11 Ways to Cope Written by Ally Hirschlag”

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