20 Different Types of Melons By Lisa Miller

Types of Melons

Melons were introduced to Europe by the Ancient Romans, and travelled to the New World with the Spanish explorers – probably as a way to help them fend off scurvy during their voyages due to their high vitamin C content. Spanish settlers are recorded as having cultivated melons starting in the mid-16th century in parts of South America.

Botanically speaking, melons are actually a type of ‘false’ berry in the Cucurbitaceae family. They will vary widely in size and color, but the ones most people are familiar with are sweet or semi-sweet fruit with a smooth or mesh-like ‘skin’ and a soft, fleshy inside part that can be consumed. Most melons will have small pockets filled with seeds (which in some cases can be eaten and are actually quite good for you) in the center of the edible flesh, while others will have the seeds spread through the flesh.

Normally a quite hardy and adaptable fruit, today melons are grown in many parts of the world although they prefer sunny, warm climates that feature lots of rain and good drainage. Hundreds of millions of tons of melons are produced worldwide every year, with China accounting over 25% of all melon production. Other major producers include Iran, Turkey, India, Brazil, the United States, Egypt and Spain.

Melons are one of the most nutritious foodstuffs around, and provide humans with a number of essential vitamins and minerals, digestive fiber, and – because of their high water content – also serve as an excellent diuretic. Additionally, many melons are downright delicious and can be eaten alone, as part of a fruit or other salad, or used in cooking other dishes.

So, what are some of the most popular types of melons?

Different Types of Melon

Watermelon

Types of Melons

Watermelon is one of the most popular of all the different melon varieties, and is probably the first melon to be eaten regularly by humans. Originating in Northeastern Africa, it has been cultivated and consumed by people for over 4,000 years. Watermelons are the fruit of a flowering, vine-like plant in the Citrullus lanatus species of the Cucurbitaceae family.

Today, about 120 million tons of watermelon is cultivated throughout the world annually, with China producing nearly 70% of the yearly crop and Iran, Turkey and Brazil together accounting for another 10%. In the United States, watermelon is grown commercially in over 40 states; the largest watermelon on record weighed just over 350 pounds and was grown by a farmer in Tennessee in 2013.

There are a very large number of varieties of watermelon – over 1,200, as a matter of fact – and they range in weight from under two pounds to over 200 pounds, but most have a few things in common. They are considered to be a tropical or sub-tropical fruit and grow best in climates where the temperature doesn’t dip much below 80 degrees Fahrenheit (25 degrees Celsius) during the growing season. Watermelons have one of the longest growing periods of any melon, often taking over 90 days to reach maturity.

Since the 1950s, watermelons have been cross-bred and genetically enhanced to improve their ability to grow in colder climates and improve their shelf-life. Seedless watermelons were first developed in Japan during the late 1930s, and today account for over 80% of all watermelon sales in the United States.

Watermelons normally have about a 90% water content (hence the name) and are completely edible – although many people choose not to eat the rinds (even though they are packed with nutrients) because of the bitter taste, and spit out the seeds. The moist, fibrous fruit is usually red, yellow or orange and is quite sweet. Watermelon is very popular throughout the world during the summer months because the fruit will remain cool for a long period of time without refrigeration due to its size.

Apart from being an excellent snack on a hot summer day, watermelon is often juiced, and sometimes mixed with other juices and fermented to produce wine. The seeds can be dried and roasted and consumed as a snack, while the rinds are often used in pickle-making, or stir fried and served as a vegetable with some Asian dishes. Watermelon seed oil is used frequently in cooking in some parts of West Africa.

Cantaloupe

Types of Melons

Cantaloupes (also sometimes called a mush melon, musk melon or sweet melon) are part of the Cucumis melo species of melons. These melons have can have either a netted or smooth peel. There are actually two main types of melons that are commonly called cantaloupes; the European and the North American cantaloupe.

The European cantaloupe (sometimes called a ‘true’ cantaloupe) normally has a smooth,

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.elist10.com/different-types-of-melons/

These 6 Fruits Treat Cold and Flu Better Than Medicines by Onlymyhealth Staff Writer

These 6 Fruits Treat Cold and Flu Better Than Medicines

Certain fruits carry high amounts of vitamins and other necessary nutrients which help you fight irritating cold and flu. If your diet consists of any these fruits, running nose and all the other symptoms of flu will not stick around you

Fruits carry germ-killing properties and can effectively boost immune system. Loaded with vitamins, fruits maintain a high level of immunity letting your body keep cold and flu at bay. Besides, consuming foods regularly can reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. Fruit also gives your body the required dietary supplements to fight the antibodies leading to ailments. Conditions like cold and flu can be very well addressed by eating the right fruit type. Now, don’t just blindly resort to medicines for the treatment of cold and flu. Here are six fruits which can help you ward off all the symptoms of cold and flu.

Apples

As we say, an apple a day, keeps the doctor away. This proverb stands true as apples are the most common source of antioxidants. One single apple carries the antioxidant effect of 1,500 mg vitamin C. Loaded with protective flavonoids, apples can prevent heart disease and cancer and also gives the required glow to the skin. It is also keeps the body healthy and protected from virus causing cold and flu.

Also read: 5 Biggest Salad Mistakes That We Need to Stop Making Now

Papayas

Carrying 250 percent of RDA of vitamin C, a papaya can keep cold and flu at bay. The beta-carotene and vitamin C and E found in papayas reduce inflammation throughout the body, eventually reducing the effects of asthma, cold and cough. This fruit also works wonders for the skin and is effective to fight dark circles.

Cranberries

Cranberries carry more antioxidants than any other fruit or vegetable. A one-time serving of this fruit has the benefits of five times the amount of broccoli. A natural probiotic, cranberries can boost the level of good bacteria in the gut and protect it from foodborne diseases. It also helps in keeping virus at bay, reducing the chances of cold and flu. Cranberries can be included in diet in the form of shakes or even as a whole fruit.

Also read: Diet for Hypertension: Summer fruits which help you treat high blood pressure

Grapefruit

Natural compounds called limonoids can be found in grapefruit. These are responsible for lowering cholesterol levels. A rich source of vitamin C, grapefruit can fight the substance lycopene. It helps in keeping the digestive system healthy and gives the required nutrients for a proper digestion system. IT also helps in reducing fever symptoms in the body, giving the much-needed nutrients to fight diseases. Also, this wonder fruit helps giving the much-needed energy to the body to fight fatigue and ill-health.

Bananas

One of the richest sources of vitamin B6, bananas can reduce fatigue, depression, stress and insomnia. It can also keep sudden hunger pangs at bay. Just one banana can lift your mood and reduce the hunger level, without adding much to the

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.onlymyhealth.com/these-6-fruits-treat-cold-and-flu-better-than-medicines-1425712376

“They told me gardening like This wouldn’t work, I didn’t listen” on YouTube

There’s nothing better than growing your own food.

We are in the process of building our raised garden beds and it eill totally be worth it!!

Let me know if you’ll be growing your own fruit and veg this year.

Bright Blessings to you and yours,

the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com 🙋🏾‍♀️✌🏽🕉

Garden Magic: Welcome to my magical garden BY RACHEL PATTERSON

Rachel Patterson is amazing!!  Have a peek…

rachel patterson magical garden

Whether you only have a window sill with a pot plant on, a small city terrace, a playing field or several acres, you can always work with the magic of your garden.  I think the kitchen extends into the garden anyway, so a Kitchen Witch will often be found pottering around in amongst the plants.

Being in regular contact with your garden and what you grow, even with your house plants or a few pots of herbs, can help you to connect with the spirit of nature and recognise the subtleties of the changing of the seasons and your garden can also provide you with food and magical ingredients.

Magical gardening does take time, focus and attention.  You can’t just plant something and leave it in the hope that several months later it will have grown, flourished and be covered in fruit or flowers (OK on the odd occasion it does happen but not often!).

My gardening memories date back to my childhood.  My dad is and always was a keen gardener, organic before it was fashionable to be so.  He has always had an allotment and a greenhouse which provide a bounty of wonderful fruit and vegetables.  Apparently even as a toddler I would disappear down the garden with him and come back covered in mud.

In my early teens I experienced food production on a large scale as I lived on a farm for a few years. Then in my late teens I had the opportunity of working for a specialist glasshouse company.  Both of those life events added to my love of the garden, food and nature’s bounty.

Once I owned by own house, the garden became key.  It is my sanctuary, a peaceful place to escape to and a space in which to create magic.

For the past twenty or so years we have lived in the same house; it is on the edge of a large city and only has a small walled garden, but it is ours and we have packed it full of as many plants, flowers and herbs as we can cram into it.  We even have a very small (i.e. teeny tiny) grow house just big enough to over winter a few pots and grow some seeds.

Even on my busy days I try to step out into the garden, if only just for a few minutes to relax and connect with Mother Earth.

Your garden, whatever size it is, opens up a whole new world of magic for you to delve in to.  Warning: Gardening is addictive and will improve your health, spirit and mental wellbeing.

Not only is a garden your direct line to a natural source of energy, it can also provide you with a whole shopping trolley full of free magical and often edible ingredients. Whether it is in the form of fruit and vegetables or flowers, petals and seeds.

Let’s open the magical box

You may imagine you need to have a beautiful picture box garden laid out in front of a thatched cottage to have a witch’s garden but really that isn’t the case.  You can style the garden in any way that suits your taste, size of garden and your budget.

Many hours and much money can be spent in garden centres and whilst they are brilliant sources for plant and design inspiration you can spend more money than you need to.  Oh…and a lot of them have a café…with cake.Plant nurseries often tend to be cheaper than garden centres but ask around.  Lots of family and friends will probably be willing to share cuttings and seeds with you.  And once your garden has a few plants in you can propagate more from those you already have.

Gardening does take time and effort.  You will need to dig, plant, weed, dead

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.patheos.com/blogs/beneaththemoon/2018/05/garden-magic/

Is Juicing Raw Vegetables Good for You? | Livestrong.com

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.livestrong.com/article/481565-is-juicing-raw-vegetables-good-for-you/