How to Grow Patio Tomatoes by Gardening Channel

How to grow successful patio tomatoes

ABOUT PATIO TOMATOES

The Patio and Patio Hybrid tomato varieties give away their gardening instructions in their names. They are designed for growing on patios, decks or balconies in containers. They grow to about two feet tall, with plenty of dark green foliage. These dwarf tomatoes are a determinate tomato variety that can be called the ideal container plant, and have become one of the most popular small container tomatoes sold in the United States. Determinate means they grow compactly and produce fruits that are close together. Patios also have relatively large fruit among the dwarf tomatoes, averaging about three to four ounces per tomato. Their strong stems and bush-like shape make them perfect for a good tomato yield right from your patio.

Want to buy tomato plants online and have them shipped to you?

We recommend The Tasteful Garden for the online purchase of tomato plants. They carry heirloom tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, slicing tomatoes, black, orange, red and many, many other tomato varieties. Check out the Legend Tomato, shown above.

IDEAL SOIL CONDITIONS FOR TOMATOES

When growing dwarf tomatoes in containers, you need a well-drained, loose, but rich soil. You can use potting soil, which is mixed for this purpose, or make your own. Mix leaf mold or fine mulch in with some peat moss, vermiculite or perlite for a lightening effect that will ensure good drainage. The basic soil that you mix these with should be a dark, moist soil like humus, or even compost. Add more peat, mulch or equivalents to heavy compost, though, to be sure it doesn’t retain water too heavily and risk

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.gardeningchannel.com/how-to-grow-patio-tomatoes/

11 Scientific Benefits of Being Outdoors

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ISTOCK

Being outdoors is fun, but even more importantly, it’s good for the brain, body, and soul. Here are some scientific reasons why you should get up close and personal with Mother Nature.

1. BEING OUTDOORS BOOSTS YOUR ENERGY.

Craving another cup of coffee? Maybe you should skip the caffeine and sit outside instead. One study suggests that spending 20 minutes in the open air gives your brain an energy boost comparable to one cup of joe.

2. IT FEELS EASIER TO EXERCISE OUTDOORS.

Does it seem noticeably easier to exercise outside? This might be thanks to your verdant surroundings. In one small study, researchers had cyclists pedal in front of green, grey, and red video footage. The bikers who exercised in front of the green reported feeling less physical exertion and more positive moods—meaning that grass, trees, and plants might add a psychological energy boost to your workout.

3. THE OUTDOORS IS GOOD FOR YOUR VISION.

Research shows that elementary school students who spend more time outdoors are less likely to develop nearsightedness.

4. NATURAL SUNLIGHT HELPS MITIGATE PAIN.

In one study, surgery patients who were exposed to high-intensity sunlight reported less stress and marginally less pain, and therefore took less pain medication.

5. THE OUTDOORS BOOSTS YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM.

Scientists think that breathing in phytoncides—airborne chemicals produced by plants—increases our levels of white blood cells, helping us fight off infections and diseases.

6. THE OUTDOORS PROVIDES YOU WITH FREE AROMATHERAPY.

According to science, you really should stop and smell the flowers. Research shows that natural scents like roses, freshly cut grass, and pine make you feel calmer and more relaxed.

7. THE OUTDOORS ENHANCES CREATIVITY.

If you’re struggling with writer’s block, you might want to ditch your laptop for the great outdoors. Psychologists found that backpackers scored 50 percent higher on creativity tests after spending a few days in the wild sans electronics.

8. THE OUTDOORS HELPS WITH SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER. 

In the winter, shorter days and lower light levels can trigger Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD—a reoccurring condition that’s marked by symptoms of anxiety, exhaustion, and sadness. Doctors say spending time outside can lessen SAD’s severity—even if the weather’s cold or overcast.

9. BEING OUTDOORS GIVES YOU

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/70548/11-scientific-benefits-being-outdoors

 

How to Fertilize Roses Co-authored by Lauren Kurtz

Lauren Kurtz, Horticulturist

Growing beautiful roses requires care and lots of nutrients. You can grow your roses best with a food balance that’s high in nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, as well as some secondary nutrients and minerals. Natural fertilizers provide steady nutrients to the soil long-term, and there are many types to choose from. Chemical fertilizers are fast-acting and need only 1-3 applications for the year. Many rose gardeners prefer to combine the two types of fertilizer for the best results.

Part1

Learning to Use Natural Fertilizers

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    Use natural fertilizers before planting and before your rose’s first bloom. For new and small rose plants, it’s best to use organic fertilizers to avoid burning their delicate roots. Add nutrients to the soil before planting your rose bush, and after you first plant them, with natural fertilizers. Wait until after they bloom the first time before using any chemical fertilizers.[1]

    • In early spring, before roses come out of dormancy and start to bloom, using natural fertilizers is the best way to get roses accustomed to new nutrients in the soil.
    • Look for fertilizers labeled organic at a local garden supply store, or use the recipes in the homemade fertilizers section.
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    Apply natural fertilizers every 4 weeks during high growth season. To keep a steady amount of nutrients flowing into your roses’ soil, use natural fertilizers every 4 weeks from early spring until 3-4 weeks before they enter dormancy. Work whatever fertilizer you choose into the upper soil levels.[2]

    • Spread solid or granular natural fertilizers in a circle around the top of the soil about 6 in (15 cm) from the base of the bush and work it into the top 2 in (5.1 cm) of soil with a small cultivator.
    • Liquid natural fertilizers can be poured in a circle about 6 in (15 cm) from the base of the bush.
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    Stop all fertilization 35-40 days before the first frost date. Applying fertilizers too late in the growing season could cause young, soft growth that’s easily damaged by the first frost. To encourage your roses to begin preparing for winter dormancy, stop fertilizing them 35-

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.wikihow.com/Fertilize-Roses

What Are They Doing!? By the Silver Sage

Hello my Arising Soul Family!

Peep this video of what they’re doing here where I live in Germany!

I hope you are well and happy.

PEACE to you and yours, the

Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com 🕉🌞✌🏽

Vegetable seeds to sow in March By BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine

There are lots of vegetable crops that can be sown in March, when the days are beginning to lengthen and become warmer.

Some crops, such as chillies and tomatoes, need to be sown early in the year in order to give them the long growing season that they need. Others, such as fast-growing beetroot and salads can be started off early so that you can enjoy them in late spring and early summer – keep sowing them to extend the harvest.

Tender crops like aubergines need to be sown under glass, either in a greenhouse or on a sunny windowsill. Hardier crops like beetroot and broad beans can be sown directly into the ground outdoors; do not sow if the ground is frosty or covered in snow.

Find out which crops you can sow in March, below.


Aubergines, chillies and tomatoes

In the unpredictable British climate, tomatoes, chillies and aubergines need a long growing season in order to produce a good crop – so start them off early. Sow under glass for the best results.

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Broad beans

Broad beans are a welcome crop in early summer, and can be sown outdoors in March. Watch out for blackfly as the plants grow – pinch out the growing tip, where they congregate.

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The Effects of Jogging Every Day By Lisa Maloney

Jogging every day offers numerous health benefits, but be aware of the risk of overtraining.
Credit: Marija Jovovic/E+/GettyImages
Tip

Jogging every day offers a host of potential benefits, including a stronger immune system, better stamina, weight loss, less risk of chronic diseases and a natural mood boost. However, it also poses a couple of potential risks, including the possibility of overtraining.

The Benefits of Jogging Regularly

Health.gov’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity each week. If you go for a half-hour jog every day, that’s enough to meet — and even beat — this requirement.

Tip

The Dietary Guidelines also notes that doubling the amount of cardio exercise to 300 minutes of moderate exertion each week yields even more extensive health benefits.

So, what’s on the menu for “better health through exercise”? The well-researched benefits of jogging and other cardiovascular exercise include:

  • Weight loss
  • Increased stamina
  • A stronger immune system
  • Decreased risk of chronic diseases, including obesity, heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and some cancers
  • Help managing chronic conditions and improving quality of life
  • An improved cholesterol profile
  • A natural mood boost

Weight Bearing and Impact

Jogging is also a weight-bearing activity that can help you build and maintain strong bones in your lower body, as long as your bones, joints and muscles can handle the repeated impact of each footfall. If you know you have weakened bones or any other condition that might affect your ability to withstand a relatively high-impact exercise, speak to your doctor before jogging every day.

Some of the steps you can take to mitigate the impact of jogging include:

  • Wear supportive, well-cushioned footwear.
  • Run on softer surfaces — such as dirt or wood chips — instead of pavement or cement.
  • Warm up and stretch before you jog; then cool down and stretch after, to reduce your risk of injury.

You can also try “water jogging” in the pool, with a flotation belt to keep you above water. This gives you all the cardiovascular benefits of jogging, with none of the impact on your bones and joints.

Read more: The 8 Best Stretches to Do Before Running

A Note for Beginners

If you’re new to exercising, or new to a particular type of exercise, it’s typical at first to develop some soreness — so that is one of the effects you might experience when you first start jogging. The good news is that this type of muscle soreness typically fades within a few days, and as your body adapts to the new exercise the soreness is less likely to come back.

While a little soreness is typical, it doesn’t have to be intense. You can minimize the soreness by taking it relatively easy on your first jogs and gradually

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.livestrong.com/article/531257-the-effects-of-jogging-every-day/

The Most Laid-Back Guide to Going Vegetarian You’ll Ever Read by Matt Frazier

It went well and I had a great time, but in hindsight, I realize the topic I chose was a tough one.

I spoke about the “no-pressure approach” to vegetarianism that I take with No Meat Athlete. Instead of trying to persuade people that they should go vegetarian (and now, dammit!), I’d much rather just set an example that people can choose to follow or learn from if they’d like. I’ve just never been one for confrontation, and I hope my writing here reflects that.

But after I was done speaking, I thought to myself: Boy, that would have been so much easier if I had just talked about the same stuff I write on the site. 

And so I got to thinking — what’s the gist of my message?

That’s when I got the idea for a series of posts that I should have written long ago. This is the first post in that series, the heart of the message I want to spread about vegetarianism (future installments will be about running and healthy eating, I think).

And as it turns out, it’s pretty much a demo of what I talked about in NYC. So that works out. 🙂

“Should” you go vegetarian?

I’d be lying if I said I didn’t want you to go vegetarian or vegan. Compassion for animals was big part of my reason for doing so, and so I’d love it if nobody ate them.

But I’m not going to tell you what’s best for you. That’s for you to decide.

Is a plant-based diet healthier than an omnivorous one?

Tough one.

I believe I’m a lot healthier now that I’m vegan. It forces me to avoid fast food and countless other convenient, but unhealthy, foods that I used to eat. So in my mind, there’s no question that a well-planned plant-based diet is healthier than the standard (terrible) American diet.

But how about compared to a whole-foods diet that happens to include a small amount (say, 10% of calories) of meat, maybe a little dairy? Honestly, I’m not convinced that one is clearly healthier than the other.

There’s a lot of science that says a plant-based diet is better. And there are plenty of people who claim that this science is bunk.

To me, it’s not clear that one diet is necessarily healthier than the other. I’m fine to call it a tie. I just know that passing up a McDonald’s is way easier for me now than it was before I was vegetarian, and as a result, I make so much more of my own food than I used to, and eat so many more fruits and vegetables than before. For that aspect, I like it.

Is a plant-based diet better for sports?

I got faster when I went vegetarian, so much so that I took over 10 minutes off my previous marathon and qualified for Boston on my first attempt after I changed my diet.

But I also changed the way I trained, so I can’t say for sure how big a role each change played. I can say that I lost 5-10 pounds when I went vegetarian, and I believe that was a huge factor in getting faster.

Brendan Brazier and Scott Jurek have both told me they believe they recover from workouts better on a plant-based diet than on

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.nomeatathlete.com/relax-2/

nefaeria: Wortcunning: Common Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) By Laurel

Tansy is one of my favourite herbs, and was facsinated by it since I was a young girl. I think that was largely due to the fact that I associated it with Faeries after seeing the Tansy Fairy (pictured above) by Cicely Mary Barker.

This is a first of what I hope to be many posts profiling various herbs, focusing on lore, magical and medicinal properties, as well as other practical information.

Please keep in mind that this is for information only, and if you do decide to ingest any herbs for medical reasons, I highly suggest that you gather as much information as possible, and do so under the guidance of a qualified healer.

I have decided to lay this out in a way that it is hopefully easy to read. If there are any herbs that you would like me to profile in particular, please leave suggestions in the comments section, or email me.

Sláinte!

Laurel

Other Names: Bitter Buttons, FaeryButtons, Buttons.

Description: Tansy is a very attractive perennial with groupings of small yellow button-like flowers and feathery leaves, and it grows to about 2 to 3 feet tall. It is native to Europe, but has become naturalized very successfully to North America.

Warnings: Is

READ MORE HERE:

http://nefaeriaofetsy.blogspot.com/2008/08/herb-profile-common-tansy-tanacetum.html?m=1

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